Newest thoughts

Synchronicity

The term “Synchronicity” was developed by the psychologist Carl Jung. It refers to ‘meaningful coincidences’ — events that seem causally disconnected, but have a clear relationship in your mind. For example, have you ever been thinking or talking about someone when they magically appear or contact you? Speak of the devil. Have you ever overheard a

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Our Stories

Our lives and our selves are our personal stories. Each perspective  is a reality, composed of a narrator, a setting, characters, and a plot. As one of my favorite philosophers of consciousness, Daniel Dennett, describes it:  “Professional novelists, like con artists, create narratives with cunning and deliberate attention to the details. The rest of us are

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Letting Go With Both Hands

A lot has happened in the 5 months since I wrote “To Let Go” — a post in which I used my experience at a Trump rally to explain my feelings about leaving graduate school.  Here’s a quick recap of some notable events in my life since then: Trump became the president I moved out of my

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Trauma

Trauma is a touchy subject. It’s like genitalia: we all have some, but we do our best to hide it. Everything we experience has an impact on us: the people and things in our lives; our thoughts and feelings; our past, our present, and even our perceived future. Because that’s what existence is: motion, collision,

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Whatever

“Whatever” is often thought of as an expression of not caring. But really, the phrase ‘whatever’ indicates a conceptual sore spot. It’s like a bright neon sign that the topic, idea, or thought at hand is something you’d rather avoid. Much like discomfort  and vulnerability, this innate desire to avoid the feeling makes us quite bad at

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Ups and Downs: Progress and Stagnation

I’ve always wanted a PhD, but I’ve never had a concept of what that means. Well, I know it stands for “Doctor of Philosophy,” but you don’t become a doctor or a philosopher when you get it… Instead “the completion of a Ph.D. is a requirement for employment as a university professor.” I thought I

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Ups and Downs: Strength and Weakness

In this series of posts about Up and Down I’ve been exploring how diametrically opposed concepts (light and darkness; hierarchy and heterarchy; comfort and discomfort) are mapped onto the spatial orientations of Up and Down, just like emotion and logic are represented by left and right. George Lakoff and Mark Johnson refer to this spatial mapping of

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Ups and Downs: Comfort and Discomfort

I ended my last post by talking about my idea that Maslow’s hierarchy of needs is really less about needs and more of an embedded heterarchy of comforts. In this post I’ll be expanding on that topic by discussing what comfort and discomfort mean in terms of the Ups and Downs of eightstep me. Feeling is

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Ups and Downs: Hierarchy and Heterarchy

As a continuation of my Ups and Downs series of posts I’ll be diving into the pyramid known as “Maslow’s hierarchy of needs.” In this hierarchy we see that our physiological requirements, like food, water, and shelter are at the bottom of the pyramid. As we rise up the hierarchy we begin to move away from

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Ups and Downs: An Introduction

So far in my writings I’ve been examining topics that display symmetry between the left and right arms of the infinity symbol: logic and emotion, fulfillment and motivation, self and reflection. But more often than not, infinity is an imprecise representation of the dualistic concepts we encounter in daily life, since left and right as portrayed in

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